The 3 Best Ukulele Humidifiers (and Why You Might Need One)

If you live anywhere that goes through dry seasons, you’ve probably felt how dry air can affect your skin and make you ridiculously thirsty.

If it gets cold where you live and you crank the heat at home, you may have even put a humidifier in your bedroom to make the air more pleasant to breathe. Right?

Well, guess what—if you’re affected by dry air, there’s a good chance your ukulele is being affected, too.

In fact, all wooden instruments (not just ukuleles) are vulnerable to extreme levels of dryness and humidity. That’s where ukulele humidifiers come in.

Why Would Someone Use a Ukulele Humidifier?

If a solid wood instrument is exposed to air that’s too dry, the wood can warp or even crack, resulting in irreversible damage to your instrument.

This happens because the moisture that’s remained inside the wood starts to “bleed” out into the air, and that creates shrinkage and cracking.

While high levels of humidity can also affect the wood, dryness is generally the bigger problem, and damage from dry air is more common than damage from excessively humid air.

Read more

A Beginner’s Guide to Best Ukulele Strings

If you’re new to playing the ukulele, you have a lot to learn. Not only do you have to practice chords, scales, and strumming patterns, you have to learn about the many parts and components of ukuleles.

One of the most important ukulele components to worry about is the strings. Choosing the right strings is vital to the overall sound and playability of your instrument.

Need help picking the best ukulele strings for you? Read on! This guide has all of the information you need.

Read more

E Chord Ukulele: How to Get Better Playing It

Musicians have been struggling to play the dreaded ukulele e-chord for years. In fact, many ukulele players can’t play the e-chord, and choose to avoid songs that include it.

The e-chord is particularly difficult to fret, meaning it requires the hand and fingers being placed in an awkward position. The tricky nature of the ukulele e-chord means that transitions between chords also become more tedious.

How do you play an E chord on a ukulele? Put the index finger on the second fret of the first string, your middle finger on the fourth fret of the fourth string, your ring finger on the fourth fret of the third string, and your pinky on the fourth fret of the second string. This is the correct way to play the e chord on a ukulele.

Ukulele players often find it easier to avoid this chord altogether, or use a similar chord in its place (most commonly the E7 chord).

However, to be a truly well-rounded ukulele player, the ability to play all major chords is essential. Eventually, players become restricted by their avoidance of the e-chord and unable to master their craft.

Thankfully, by following these professional ukulele chord tips, mastering the e-chord is possible for even the most uncertain players. With a little time and practice, this chord begins to blend in with all the others and becomes part of a comprehensive ukulele playing skill set.

Are you ready to do what it takes to overcome the ukulele e-chord? Then let’s dive in!

Read more

How To Read Ukulele Tablature (Step-by-Step Tutorial)

Whether you want to jam out to “Somewhere Over the Rainbow” or “Hey Jude,” you need to become familiar with how to read ukulele tabs. Fortunately, once you get the hang of it, it proves surprisingly straightforward to read and write ukulele tablature (a.k.a. tab). Expect to progress at a rapid pace, astonishing your friends and family with your newfound song repertoire.

That said, mastering ukulele tabs could feel downright frustrating without a basic understanding of how the system works. You also need to understand its strengths and limitations. So, let’s dive into everything you need to know about ukulele tab.

Famous tunes adapted for ukulele abound. We’ve already mentioned two of them above, “Somewhere Over the Rainbow” and “Hey Jude.” There’s also:

  • “Can’t Help Falling in Love”
  • “No Woman, No Cry”
  • “Sunday Morning”
  • “Losing My Religion”
  • “Dream a Little Dream of Me”

The list goes on and on. This gives you a taste of some of the awesome renditions you’ll perform as you progress through ukulele literature.

What do all of these songs have in common that’s central to learning tab music on the ukulele? You can probably hum most if not all of them. Right?

That’s a central concept when it comes to successfully using tab to learn music. Why? Because unlike standard musical notation, tablature does not express tempo (timing) and rhythm.

Read more

Intro to Baritone Ukulele – A Starter’s Guide

intro to baritone ukulele

The ukulele is a popular instrument that is easy-to-learn and fun to play!  It can make virtually any song sound great and people love hearing their favorite tunes played on a ukulele.  The small size of ukuleles also means they are very portable — making them the perfect option for taking camping or traveling.

But did you know there are many types of ukuleles?  The largest ukulele is called a baritone ukulele.  It is a great choice for anyone interested in a ukulele with a deeper and richer sound.

If the idea of a baritone ukulele sounds interesting, you have reached the right place. This guide will share all of the information you need to know about baritone ukuleles including where they came from and what materials they use.  We’ll also share some of the best ukuleles on the market.

A (brief) history of the baritone ukulele

The ukulele was first created by instrument makers in Hawaii in the 19th-Century, to emulate the Portuguese machete — a small instrument used by Portuguese immigrants.  “Ukulele” loosely translates to “jumping flea” in Hawaiian, which may be a reference to the quick finger movements of skilled ukulele players.  The ukulele eventually became popular internationally and has been used by some very prominent musicians over the years.

The baritone ukulele was sold commercially sometime around 1950 in the United States.  There are conflicting stories about who was responsible for the design of the baritone ukulele, with both Arthur Godfrey and Herk Favilla developing the instrument at different times.

Read more